Europe Adopts 5 WPM as Morse Code Standard


tratto da:
The ARRL Letter Vol. 20, No. 12 March 23, 2001

* Europe Adopts 5 WPM as Morse Code Standard:
The Conference of Postal and Telecommunications
Administrations--CEPT--has effectively lowered the Amateur Radio Morse code test speed to 5 WPM for all European countries. The CEPT Radio Regulatory Working Group (WGRR), meeting last month in The Hague, adopted a revision of Recommendation 61-02 to include the 5 WPM standard.
The European Radiocommunication Office published the revised version of T/R 61-02 this month. The revision, which establishes requirements for the issuance of a Harmonised Amateur Radio Examination Certificate (HAREC), reduces the Morse requirement from 12 WPM. "In revising what is known as the CEPT Recommendation T/R 61-02, it has in effect recommended to 44 European countries to adopt the 5 WPM standard," said Wireless Institute of Australia-Victoria President Jim Linton, VK3PC, who closely follows global developments in Amateur Radio Morse code trends. Additional information is available on Linton's Morse code watch site, http://www.wiavic.org.au/mcw .
More information on CEPT is on the ERO Web site, http://www.ero.dk .


Europe Adopts 5 WPM as Morse Code Standard

NEWINGTON, CT, Mar 21, 2001--The Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations--CEPT--has effectively lowered the Amateur Radio Morse code test speed to 5 WPM for all European countries. The CEPT Radio Regulatory Working Group (WGRR), meeting last month in The Hague, adopted a revision of Recommendation 61-02 to include the 5 WPM standard. The European Radiocommunication Office published the revised version of T/R 61-02 this month.

The revision to T/R 61-02, which establishes requirements for the issuance of a Harmonised Amateur Radio Examination Certificate (HAREC), reduces the Morse requirement from 12 WPM. The HAREC provides a common licensing system for hams native to one participating country who become residents of another participating country. The revision makes no change in T/R 61-01, which covers hams making short visits to other CEPT and to participating non-CEPT countries.

"In revising what is known as the CEPT Recommendation T/R 61-02, it has in effect recommended to 44 European countries to adopt the 5 WPM standard," said Wireless Institute of Australia-Victoria President Jim Linton, VK3PC, who closely follows global developments in Amateur Radio Morse code trends. Linton said the revision of the HAREC standards came in the wake of decisions by a number of European countries to adopt a 5 WPM examination requirement for operation on all bands and modes. Within CEPT, Belgium and Germany are the latest countries to lower their Morse code requirement for full HF access to 5 WPM.

According to minutes of the meeting held in The Hague, the decision was not unanimous. One administration felt it would be premature to adopt a change in Morse code examination requirements prior to the World Radiocommunication Conference in 2003, where a complete revision of the relevant provisions in the Radio Regulations is on the agenda. Another administration said 5 WPM was too low and proposed reducing the speed requirement to 8 WPM instead.

Non-CEPT countries whose domestic licenses meet the HAREC standard include Australia, Canada, Israel, Netherlands Antilles, New Zealand, Peru, Puerto Rico, South Africa and the US. Most of these non-CEPT HAREC countries already have or are about to lower their amateur code requirement to 5 WPM.

"In adopting the 5 WPM standard, most countries acknowledge that the mandatory Morse code amateur license requirement is unlikely to remain when ITU Radio Regulations governing the Amateur Service are reviewed at the World Radiocommunication Conference in 2003," Linton said.

Linton has posted additional information on his Morse code watch site http://www.wiavic.org.au/mcw .

More information on CEPT, including the full texts of T/R 61-01 and T/R 61-02, are on the ERO Web site http://www.ero.dk .

Europe Adopts 5 WPM as Morse Code Standard


IARU Administrative Council Calls for End to Morse Requirement


(Oct 12, 2001) -- Saying that it was "setting aside any previous relevant decisions," the International Amateur Radio Union Administrative Council this week resolved that IARU policy supports "the removal of Morse code testing as an ITU requirement for an amateur license to operate on frequencies below 30 MHz." The Council further resolved to urge member societies--as an interim measure--to seek Morse code testing speeds "not exceeding five words per minute."

IARU Administrative Council Calls for End to Morse Requirement

NEWINGTON, CT, Oct 12, 2001--Saying that it was "setting aside any previous relevant decisions," the International Amateur Radio Union Administrative Council this week resolved that IARU policy supports "the removal of Morse code testing as an ITU requirement for an amateur license to operate on frequencies below 30 MHz." The Council further resolved to urge member societies--as an interim measure--to seek Morse code testing speeds "not exceeding five words per minute."

The resolution was adopted during the IARU Administrative Council meeting October 6-8 in Guatemala City, Guatemala. The Council session followed the 14th General Assembly of IARU Region 2 (see "International Amateur Radio Union Region 2 Conference Concludes". The principal business at the Guatemala City meeting was to continue preparations for World Radiocommunication Conference 2003, which has several items of importance to Amateur Radio on its agenda.

The Council's Morse resolution took into consideration the approval--without opposition--of ITU-R Recommendation M.1544 (see "ITU Adopts Recommendation on Amateur Qualifications". That document sets out the minimum qualifications of radio amateurs. The Council said it recognizes that Morse code "continues to be an effective and efficient mode of communication used by many thousands of radio amateurs" but that Morse code proficiency as requirement for an HF amateur license "is no longer relevant to the healthy future of Amateur Radio."

A possible revision of Article S25 of the international Radio Regulations is on the agenda for WRC-2003. Among other things, Article S25 spells out Amateur Radio operator qualifications. It now provides that Amateur Radio license applicants demonstrate the ability "to send correctly by hand and to receive correctly by ear, texts in Morse code signals" for operation below 30 MHz.

The Council supports the revision of Article S25 and the incorporation by reference of Recommendation M.1544. This would permit the Recommendation concerning Amateur Service operator qualifications to be updated in an appropriate ITU-R study group rather than drafted in a World Radiocommunication Conference.

The Administrative Council also reviewed the status of IARU preparations for WRC-2003, to be held in Venezuela. The Council also affirmed IARU objectives with regard to agenda items of concern, which include other possible revisions to Article S25 beyond the Morse issue; the harmonization of amateur and broadcasting allocations near 7 MHz; the adequacy of HF broadcasting allocations below 10 MHz; changes to terms and definitions in Article S1, as a result of amendments to Article S25; and review of provisions concerning the formation of amateur call signs in Article S19.

Other agenda items of concern to amateurs include additional allocations for Little LEO satellites; study of a possible allocation to the earth exploration-satellite service for synthetic aperture radars (SARs) near 435 MHz; and possible identification of globally harmonized frequency bands for use by agencies and organizations dealing with public protection--such as police--and disaster relief.

The IARU Council also selected the theme of the next World Amateur Radio Day, April 18, 2002, as "Amateur Radio: Continuing Innovation in Communication Technology."

In other business, the IARU Administrative Council:

identified ITU meetings at which IARU representation will be required for the coming year and reviewed and the recommendations of the President and International Secretariat regarding representatives to attend these meetings. The Council also reviewed reparations for IARU participation in upcoming ITU regional and world TELECOMs and forums.

reviewed, updated and approved the present and anticipated future requirements for radio spectrum allocations to the amateur and amateur-satellite services.

adopted the budget for 2002-2004 as submitted by the International Secretariat. The budget includes provision for financial contributions from the three regional organizations to defray a portion of the expenses.

agreed to continue monitoring ongoing discussions of reform of the ITU structure, with regard to any changes affecting Amateur Radio.

noted the growing popularity of the IARU HF World Championship and urged headquarters stations of member-societies to participate. The Council also urged the members of the regional executive committees to take part on an individual basis.

received with thanks a report from the International Secretariat on new technologies being introduced in the Amateur Service and expressed appreciation for the contributions of the individuals responsible for these exciting developments.

Reports of IARU international coordinators and advisers were received. Retiring Beacon Project Coordinator Bob Fabry, N6EK, was thanked for his work. The Council also applauded retiring IARU Region 2 President Tom Atkins, VE3CDM, for his distinguished contributions to the work of the IARU and the Administrative Council during his 18 years of service as an officer of Region 2.

Attending the Administrative Council meeting were IARU President Larry Price, W4RA; Vice President David Wardlaw, VK3ADW; Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ; regional representatives Ole Garpestad, LA2RR, Tom Atkins, VE3CDM, Rod Stafford, W6ROD, Ron Szama, LU2AH, Fred Johnson, ZL2AMJ, and Y. S. Park, HL1IFM; and recording secretary Paul Rinaldo, W4RI.

The next scheduled meeting of the Council will be held on 11-13 September 2002, in the vicinity of San Marino, immediately before the Conference of IARU Region 1.

Notizia prelevata dal seguente sito: http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2001/10/12/100/?nc=1
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Traduzione italiana

Il Consiglio Amministrativo della IARU richiede la revoca del requisito del Codice Morse

nel confermare che, a parte "qualsiasi precedente decisione sul caso", il Consiglio Amministrativo dell' Unione Internazionale dei Radioamatori ha affermato, questa settimana, che la politica della IARU e' a favore "della revoca della prova in codice Morse, quale requisito della ITU per le licenze di radioamatore operanti al di sotto dei 30 MHz".

Tale Consiglio ha altresi' deciso l' urgenza, per le associazioni affiliate, -- quale misura da adottare nel frattempo -- di richiedere che le prove in codice Morse non superino la velocita' di cinque parole al minuto.

La deliberazione ' stata adottata dal Consiglio Amministrativo della IARU in occasione dei lavori che si sono tenuti nei giorni 6-8 Ottobre a Guatemala City (Guatemala) e che hanno fatto seguito alla 14> Assemblea Generale della IARU per la Regione 2.

Per la delibera sul codice Morse, il Consiglio ha preso in considerazione, senza opposizioni, la raccomandazione ITU-R M.1544. Questo documento determina i requisiti minimi per la qualifica di radioamatore.
Da parte del Consiglio viene altresi' riconosciuto che il codice Morse "continua ad essere un modo effettivo ed efficiente di comunicazione usato da molte migliaia di radioamatori", ma che la sua conoscenza operativa, quale requisito per una licenza di amatore in HF, non sia piu' di importanza vitale per un buon sviluppo del Servizio di Radioamatore.

L' argomento principale della sessione del Consiglio Amministrativo era di rivedere le posizioni della IARU per i preparativi della WRC-2003. L' agenda dei lavori inerenti i Radioamatori include, fra le altre cose, l' armonizzazione delle allocazioni dei radioamatori e delle broadcasting vicino ai 7 MHz.,l' adeguamento delle allocazioni delle stazioni broadcasting HF sotto i 10 MHz. e le possibili revisioni all' articolo S25 del Regolamento Internazionale delle Radiocomunicazioni.

Fra le altre cose, l' articolo S25 determina i requisiti dell' operatore di una stazione di Radioamatore.
Attualmente recita che i richiedenti di una licenza di stazione di Radioamatore debbono dimostrare la capacita' di trasmettere manualmente e di ricevere correttamente con l' udito dei testi, per mezzo di segnali in codice Morse per poter operare al di sotto di 30 MHz.
Da parte del Consiglio Amministrativo della IARU si afferma la volonta' per la revisione dell' articolo S25 incorporandovi quale riferimento la raccomandazione M.1544.

Infine il Consiglio della IARU ha definito il tema della prossima giornata mondiale del Radioamatore, per il 18 Aprile 2002 come "Radioamatore: la continuit. dell' innovazione nella tecnologia delle Comunicazioni"

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